Nelson Mandela International Day – 18 July

Nelson Mandela in 2000

 It is easy to break down and destroy.
The heroes are those who make peace and build. 

 – Nelson Mandela

The Legacy of Nelson Mandela

Nelson Mandela was a nonviolence anti-apartheid activist who became South Africa’s first black president after winning the country’s first democratic election. Discover more about the life of Nelson Mandela with these titles from our e-library.

Commemorated on July 18—Nelson Mandela’s birthday—Nelson Mandela International Day celebrates the idea that each individual has the power to transform the world and the ability to make an impact.

Let the life and achievements of Nelson Mandela inspire you to learn more about social justice. Discover this new collection of titles exploring social justice, anti-racism and equality available from our e-library.


Recommended titles


Invictus by John Carlin

When Nelson Mandela appeared wearing a Springboks jersey and led the all-white Afrikaner-dominated team in singing South Africa’s new national anthem, he conquered the hearts of white South Africa. Invictus shows how a sport, once the preserve of South Africa’s Afrikaans-speaking minority, came to unify the new rainbow nation, and tells of how something as simple as a game can help people to rise above themselves and see beyond their differences. Borrow now.


Invisible Women: Exposing Data Bias in a World Designed for Men by Caroline Criado Perez

Imagine a world where your phone is too big for your hand, where your doctor prescribes a drug that is wrong for your body, where in a car accident you are 47% more likely to be seriously injured, where every week the countless hours of work you do are not recognised or valued. Invisible Women shows us how, in a world largely built for and by men, we are systematically ignoring half the population, creating a pervasive but invisible bias with a profound effect on women’s lives. Borrow now.


The Good Immigrant by Nikesh Shukla

How does it feel to be constantly regarded as a potential threat, strip-searched at every airport? Or be told that, as an actress, the part you’re most fitted to play is ‘wife of a terrorist’? Bringing together 21 exciting black, Asian and minority ethnic voices emerging in Britain today, The Good Immigrant explores why immigrants come to the UK, why they stay and what it means to be ‘other’ in a country that doesn’t seem to want you, doesn’t truly accept you – but still needs you for its diversity monitoring forms. Borrow now.


Double Victory: African American Women Broke Race and Gender Barriers to Help Win World War II by Cheryl Mullenbach

Double Victory tells the stories of African American women who did extraordinary things to help their country during World War II. In these pages young readers meet a range of remarkable women: war workers, political activists, military women, volunteers, and entertainers. Some, such as Mary McLeod Bethune and Lena Horne, were celebrated in their lifetimes and are well known today. But many others fought discrimination at home and abroad in order to contribute to the war effort yet were overlooked during those years and forgotten by later generations. Borrow now.


White Rage The Unspoken Truth of Our Racial Divide by Carol Anderson

As Ferguson, Missouri, erupted in August 2014, and media commentators across the ideological spectrum referred to the angry response of African Americans as “black rage,” historian Carol Anderson wrote a remarkable op-ed in The Washington Post suggesting that this was, instead, “white rage at work. With so much attention on the flames,” she argued, “everyone had ignored the kindling.” From the Civil War to our combustible present, acclaimed historian Carol Anderson reframes our continuing conversation about race, chronicling the powerful forces opposed to black progress in America. Borrow now.

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