Category Archives: Healthy Eating

Guest blog – Healthy Chocolate

Ahead of her event for Brent Libraries next month Aneta Grabiec tells us more about her mission to inform the world about the benefits of raw chocolate.

I Love chocolate and chocolate loves me back!  It all started with the Mayans in Mexico where they would use cacao as medicine, and modern science agrees – chocolate can be good for you!

green chocolate

Let’s get things straight linguistically here: chocolate is the product of cacao (raw cacao powder is made by cold-pressing unroasted cocoa beans). ‘Cocoa product’ is a sugary powdered milk substitute of chocolate.

Cacao has nearly twice the antioxidants found in red wine and almost triple the antioxidants of green tea. Most people know that dark chocolate contains magnesium, and most of us don’t get enough of it. But there are many other nutrients in cacao, including vitamins A, B1, B2, B3, B5, C, D, E; and minerals such as calcium, iron, zinc, copper, potassium, and phosphorus.

To extract the health benefits from every bite, I recommend dark chocolate. Dark chocolate falls into the category of healthy monounsaturated fats—along with avocados, nuts, and seeds. Milk chocolate contains milk, which counters the benefit of the flavanols, a type of flavonoid (phytonutrient) in cacao. For example, one flavanol in chocolate is epicatechin, which acts as an antioxidant and supports insulin sensitivity. (Insulin imbalance causes diabetes type 2 and overweight).

What’s more: Dark chocolate made with at least 70 percent cacao has been proven to lower cortisol, the body’s main stress hormone. Another molecule in chocolate called phenylethylamine acts like a gentle antidepressant. Dark chocolate raises serotonin, the feel-good brain chemical in charge of mood, sleep, and appetite. Do I need to say more?

Research shows that subjects who had 40 grams (1.5 ounces) of dark chocolate per day, for two weeks, showed lowered cortisol levels.

Dark chocolate has been shown to lower blood pressure. It reduces cholesterol and lowers your risk of heart disease.

It increases blood flow to the brain, which helps the brain remain neuroplastic and young. It improves executive functioning—including attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, problem-solving, and planning.

Many people speak about the medicinal properties of chocolate, particularly because it provides an antioxidant boost that counters the stress of aging and modern life. From a nutrigenomic perspective, cacao interrupts the motor pathway, which helps to slow down aging. It reduces the inflammation associated with acute stress.

Read the labels!

Extra dark chocolate—at least 80 percent cacao or higher, is ideal. When chocolate has higher cacao content, it has more health benefits, in part because there are more flavanols and in part because there is less sugar. I recommend organic, soy-free, dairy-free, gluten-free chocolate. If you want to cut out sugar altogether, there are some options sweetened with stevia and coconut sugar. Avoid chocolate with 5 grams of sugar or more (per recommended portion of 25g)

I feel that the best and healthiest way to enjoy the chocolate is to make it! I praise and promote raw chocolate due its exceptional medicinal content (the ingredients don’t get heated up to high temperature, therefore, most beneficial nutrients of the ingredients remain in the chocolate). Come along to my fun and informative raw chocolate making workshop on 6 December where I will be sharing the knowledge and creating dark delicious superfood out of best quality ingredients.

Come and join me for the Healthy chocolate workshop, at The Library at Willesden Green, 6 December 6.15-7.30pm.  £2 – book here.

Aneta

Aneta Grabiec,

The Wellness Designer, http://www.thewellnessdesigner.com

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Filed under Brent Libraries, Event, Healthy Eating, Libraries

Books to read to improve your health

As person who is trying to lead a more healthy more “organic” life (which I believe is a made up word for natural and before supermarkets and chemical engineers mess with perfectly good food) I can’t state how much I enjoy reading books by Dale Pinnock the Medicinal Chef. The recipes are easy to follow some use minimal ingredients but taste great for example the Kale chips. Also unlike some others there is no abuse of power words like revitalising and nourishing, instead he clearly explains the health benefits and goes into how different foods help skin, hair, digestion, respiratory system, immune system etc. His books even explain how food can be used to improve emotional health which included things like anxiety and depression.

Medicinal Chef

I highly recommend these books to anyone wanting to eat and live well.

 

James

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Filed under Book Review, books, Brent Libraries, Healthy Eating, non-fiction, reading